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Art, Craft & Design

Intent:

The curriculum has been designed to empower children with virtues that enable them to excel academically and spiritually inspiring them to serve humanity selflessly (Nishkam), with an abundance of love, compassion and forgiveness. The curriculum aims to support pupils to learn about peace, forgiveness, love and faith in the Divine through their academic subjects, faith practice and personal development. 

Our curriculum is constructed around our vision to ensure we remain:  

Faith-inspired: learning from the wisdom of religion.

Our pupils explore the divine context of humanity and wonder of all creation. They not only learn about, but also learn from, the wisdom of religions and in so doing explore the infinite human potential to do good unconditionally. We support pupils to develop aspects of their own religious, spiritual or human identities. They learn about serenity through prayer and humility in service and in so doing, they deepen their own respective faith, and respect the common purpose of all religious traditions, as well as respecting the beliefs of those with no faith tradition. They explore the unique divinity of the individual, and our common humanity. 

Virtues-led: nurturing compassionate, responsible human beings.

We believe that the fostering of human virtues forms the foundation of all goodness. Our curricula are carefully enriched to allow experiences where our pupils, teachers and parents alike learn to grow through a conscious focus on virtues. Our virtues-led education approach helps to provide guidance to enable pupils to understand their choices in order to help lead better lives. Our pupils become self-reflective and flourish; they are able to build strong, meaningful relationships and understand their responsibilities to the global family and all creation, founded in faith. Pupils learn to experience faith through lived out through righteous living in thought, action and deed. 

Aspiring for Excellence: in all that we do. 

Our pupils and staff alike aim to become the best human beings they can possibly be, in all aspects of spiritual, social, intellectual and physical life. We foster a school culture which inspires optimism and confidence, hope and determination for all to achieve their best possible. This is accomplished through a rich and challenging curriculum, along with excellent teaching to nurture awe and wonder. Pupils gain a breadth and depth of knowledge and a love of learning to achieve their full potential. 

The curriculum at Nishkam School West London has been carefully crafted to be broad, balanced and stimulating, giving every Nishkam student the opportunity to be knowledgeable, multi-skilled, highly literate, highly numerate, creative, expressive, compassionate and confident people.  Knowledge-rich, skills based and Faith-inspired, the Curriculum at Nishkam School West London is delivered through three Golden Threads that are unique to our ethos and virtues: 

1 Love and forgiveness vs. Enmity and Hate

2 Peace and Collaboration vs. Conflict and War  

3 Trust in God 

Every composite of our curriculum is constructed of components that have each of these threads at their core.  These elements can be clearly identified in our subject-based curriculum maps and Schemes of Learning documents.    

The Nishkam vision for Art, Craft and Design is centred around providing opportunities for every child to express their individuality and creativity. Our young artists take ownership of their own life experiences by visualising their beliefs, identity, thoughts and emotions. Pupils will meet artists, craftspeople and designers, visit galleries and art spaces and experience all areas of the creative industries.  

From EYFS through to KS5 the curriculum is designed to develop:  

  • Skills and proficiency in the use of a wide range of materials  

  • Teaching children how to strengthen their ability to think creatively  

  • Develop their self-esteem, confidence and self-awareness  

  • Strengthen their thinking and analytical skills, which are transferable to all subject areas   

  • Understanding the life experiences and the impact that artists, craftspeople and designers have had on society and throughout human history   

  • Incorporating the Nishkam Virtues into their everyday personal development and art practice. 

The Nishkam curriculum for Art, Craft and Design will prepare students for a quickly developing and increasingly global world and visually complex world.  

The ideal art student is: 

  • Passionate about creating and experiencing all forms of art 

  • Regularly visits galleries and takes an active interest in the work of historical and contemporary artists 

  • Independently learns and develops new skills, techniques and how to use different materials 

  • Keeps a sketchbook full of ideas, notes, sketches, drawings and paintings 

  • Learns from mistakes and sees the process of failure, accidents and imperfections as a necessary journey towards competency and creativity. 

  • Is open to new ideas and concepts and is flexible enough to view the world through other people's eyes. 

The curriculum is necessarily aspirational, focused on excellence and on securing in all learners a love of learning through the acquisition of knowledge, the study and practice of faith, and an understanding of the world around them. One aspect of the curriculum is the school ethos of the golden threads. Students will learn via collaboration, peace, forgiveness, and love through each unit of work. 

 

Implementation: 

 
Half Term 1 
Half Term 2 
Half Term 3 
Half Term 4 
Half Term 5 
Half Term 6 
Year 7 

Yr 7 Baseline Assessment 

 

POP ART PROJECT/COLOUR 

Project which teaches pupils about the Pop Art Movement. Research artists, colour theory, Venn diagram comparing artists, Keith Haring copy, KAT1 in Pop art style.  

Brief: Create word art in the Pop art style. 

 

Black Curriculum: Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat 

Cultural Capital: Impact of the Pop Art movement on art, popular culture, and media.  

 

DT Curriculum covered: D1, D2, D5, M1, M2, E1 

LINE 

Introduction to the formal element line. Pupils will look at mark making, negative positive and Notan design theory.  

Brief: Create a Notan inspired cut out drawing. 

 

Cultural Capital: Art from Japan, spiritual concepts of balance and harmony. 

 

DT Curriculum covered: D1, D2, D5, M1, M2, E1 

INDIGENOUS ART 

ANIMALS 

Understand what the word indigenous means and who indigenous people are. Look at history, culture and Faith and how animals have been incorporated into art and craft across the world and their place in art history and culture.  

Brief: Create a dragon eye made from clay  

Cultural Capital: China Native American Art, First Nations, Aztecs, Aboriginals etc.. 

 

DT Curriculum covered: D1, D2, D5, M1, M2, E1 

PERSPECTIVE 

Perspective project stage one: 1-point perspective 

Brief: Draw a fantasy 1-point perspective scene of either train tracks or inside a room. 

 

DT Curriculum covered: D1, D2, D5, M1, M2, E1 

 

Year 8 

EMBROIDERY PROJECT 

Develop an understanding of embroidery as an art form and some different embroidery artists. Learn embroidery techniques 

Brief: Think of what the most important thing in your life is, create a design and embroider it onto fabric.  

 

Artists: Helen Wilde​, Vera Shimunia​, Giselle Quinto, Humayrah Bint Altaf​, Adam Pritchett​, Trisha Thompson Adams​, Sarah K. Benning​, Tracey Emin, Danielle Clough 

 

Cultural Capital: Textiles, embroidery artists and women’s art/craft (place in history, how/why its overlooked, importance etc 

 

DT Curriculum covered: D1, D2, D5, M1, M2, E1, T1 

PINCH POT MONSTERS 

Short clay project learning clay basics and hand building techniques. Props and fantasy from films 

Brief: Build a fantasy pinch pot monster 

 

Cultural Capital:  Ai Wei Wei, mass production, Maria Martinez, Augusta Savage, 

 

DT Curriculum covered: M1, M2, E1, T1 

IDENTITY (SIKH ART) 

Short project teaching pupils how to mix colours to paint self-portraits including graphical elements that visualise and explore their own lockdown experiences. 

Brief: Create a self-portrait which reflects on personal lockdown experiences using imagery and text. 

 

 

Cultural Capital: Amrita Sher-Gil, Singh Twins, Inkuisitive, Shirin Neshat, etc 

Black Curriculum: Amy Sherald, Kehinde Wiley, Elizabeth Catlett 

Artists: Frida Kahlo, Greg Sands, 

 

DT Curriculum covered: D1, D2, D5, M1, M2, E1, T1 

TONE 

Short project teaching pupils how to develop their tonal drawing and shading skills. Pupils will explore how different artists use tone in their artwork and learn how to use these techniques themselves. 

 

DT Curriculum covered: M1, M2, E1, T1 

CUBISM 

Exploring a key and influential movement which has influenced much of 20th Century European Art. Explore knowledge and relevance of still life studies and its impact on an artist’s development. Build tone into this unit (to cover what pupils missed last year). Weeping Woman KAT, Guernica and impact of war  

Brief: Create a mixed media collage of a still life of musical instruments, bottles, etc. 

Cultural Capital: Impact of the Cubism on world art 

 

DT Curriculum covered: D1, D2, D5, M1, M2, E1 

 

 

PERSPECTIVE 

Perspective project stage two: 2-point perspective 

 

Brief: Draw a final piece fantasy 2-point perspective scene of a street or spaceship scene 

 

DT Curriculum covered: D1, D2, D5, M1, M2, E1 

 

Year 9 

ISSUE BASED GRAPHICS  

A project which allows pupils to experiment with a variety of techniques, develop skills and competency when using different materials. Current issues: effects of COVID, lock down experiences, black lives matter, supporting the NHS, global economy/recession, use of food banks etc… (Use Hope to Nope exhibition books and images) 

Brief: Create a poster which explores a current social issue (outcome) and why is should be created, plan, design and create the final piece. Tie into the fourth plinth competition and the debate about statues and the role they play in our society.  

 

Black Curriculum: Artists and the impact of BLM movement 

Cultural Capital: Experiences of people around the world.  

Artists: Shepard Fairey, Barbara Kruger etc 

 

DT Curriculum covered: D1, D2, D3, D4, D5, M1, M2, E1, E3, T1 

COIL POTS – My Life 

Exploration of ceramics, history used and importance to society. Pupils will develop their ceramics and hand building skills by creating coil pots. Coils arranged using a patterns and repetition. Optional words can be incorporated.   

Brief: Create a coil pot with secure coils attached using inspiration pupils’ own life experiences 

 

Black Curriculum: Kimmy Cantrell 

Cultural Capital: Jason Garcia (Pueblo Warriors Jar) video 

Artists: Grayson Perry, animated pot (zoetrope) 

 

 

DT Curriculum covered: D3, D4, M1, M2, E1, T1 

 

SURREALISM/ PHOTOMONTAGE  

Exploring the surreal / fantasy and its place in art. Researching why and how artists created artwork and what it says about the artist and society.  

Brief: Create Surreal photomontage compositions onto photographs of NSWL in and around the building.  

Black Curriculum: Kara Walker, Krista franklin 

Artists: Rene Magritte, Salvidor Dali, Remedios Varo, Eugenia Loli 

Hannah Hoch, Sarah Eisenlohr, Ayham Jabr 

 

DT Curriculum covered: D1, D2, D5, M1, M2, E1 

 

NATURE 

Short lino printing project linked to nature with A virtual visits to Kew Gardens and the V&A. Explore Islamic Patterns and the link with unity of God and Nature. Loose paintings of birds in the style of Angela Moulton. 

Brief: Create a reduction print of a plant form for use on a product (I.e. t shirt, wallpaper, bathroom tile etc) 

Artists: Edward Bawden, William S. Rice, Angie Lewin 

 

DT Curriculum covered: D1, D2, D5, M1, M2, E1 

 

 PERSPECTIVE 

Perspective project stage three: 3-point perspective and beyond 

Brief: Draw a final piece 3-point perspective scene of the student’s choice. 

Artists: Patrick Hughes, 

 

DT Curriculum covered: D1, D2, D5, M1, M2, E1 

 

Year 10 

Structure – Fruits/Plants 

Journal of skills and techniques. 

  • Drawing (tracing, observational drawing, ink, pen, iPad, charcoal etc.) 

  • Annotation and analysis 

  • Painting (watercolours, acrylic, oil, iPad etc.) 

  • Printing (mono, polytile, lino, etching etc.) 

  • Artist research and analysis 

  • Photography (cameras, shutter speeds etc.) 

  • Digital: Photoshop, Illustrator) 

  • 3D (cardboard, clay, wire etc.) 

 

Component 1: Portfolio 

Unit 1: Close Up (30 weeks = 1 terms) 

Pupils choose their own topic and artists, developing their theme in a sketchbook. At least one final piece. 

Component 1: Portfolio 

Unit 1: Close Up (30 weeks = 2 terms) 

Pupils choose their own topic and artists, developing their theme in a sketchbook. At least one final piece. 

 

What's assessed  

A portfolio that in total shows explicit coverage of the four assessment objectives. It must include a sustained project evidencing the journey from initial engagement to the realisation of intentions and a selection of further work undertaken during the student’s course of study.  

 

How it's assessed 

  • No time limit  

  • 96 marks  

  • 60% of GCSE  

 

Non-exam assessment (NEA) set and marked by the school/college and moderated by AQA during a visit. Moderation will normally take place in June of the second year. 

 

Assessment objectives (AOs) are set by Ofqual and are the same across all GCSE Art and Design specifications and all exam boards. The exams and non-exam assessment will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives.  

  • AO1: Develop ideas through investigations, demonstrating critical understanding of sources.  

  • AO2: Refine work by exploring ideas, selecting and experimenting with appropriate media, materials, techniques and processes.  

  • AO3: Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.  

  • AO4 Present a personal and meaningful response that realises intentions and demonstrates understanding of visual language. 

  

 

Component 1: Portfolio 

Unit 2: Me, Myself and I (16 weeks = 1 term, last 2 weeks of term)  

Pupils choose their own topic and artists, developing their theme in a sketchbook. At least one final piece. Pupils can use this unit to develop a particular title (i.e. Fine Art, Graphics etc). 

Year 11 

Component 1: Portfolio 

Unit 2: Me, Myself and I (16 weeks = 1 term, last 2 weeks of term) 

Pupils choose their own topic and artists, developing their theme in a sketchbook. At least one final piece. Pupils can use this unit to develop a particular title (i.e. Fine Art, Graphics etc). 

Component 2: Externally set assignment (exam board set topics) 

Pupils choose from given topics and choose their own relevant artists, developing their theme in a sketchbook.  

 

What's assessed 

Students respond to their chosen starting point from an externally set assignment paper relating to their subject title, evidencing coverage of all four assessment objectives.  

 

How it's assessed  

  • Preparatory period followed by 10 hours of supervised time  

  • 96 marks  

  • 40% of GCSE  

 

Non-exam assessment (NEA) set by AQA; marked by the school/college and moderated by AQA during a visit. Moderation will normally take place in June of the second year. 

 

Assessment Objectives above apply.  

 

The final piece is made over 2 days (10 hours) exam conditions. 

 

Exhibition and moderation preparation 

N/A 

Design Technology: 

Points from the Design Technology Curriculum (KS3) that are covered in are art indicated above using the code below.   

  

Design -  
D1 

Research and exploration, such as the study of different cultures, to identify and understand user needs 

D2 

Identify and solve their own design problems and understand how to reformulate problems given to them 

D3 

Develop specifications to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that respond to needs in a variety of situations 

D4 

Use a variety of approaches [for example, biomimicry and user-centred design], to generate creative ideas and avoid stereotypical responses 

D5 

Develop and communicate design ideas using annotated sketches, detailed plans, 3-D and mathematical modelling, oral and digital presentations and computer-based tools 

  

Make -  
M1 

Select from and use specialist tools, techniques, processes, equipment and machinery precisely, including computer-aided manufacture 

M2 

Select from and use a wider, more complex range of materials, components and ingredients, taking into account their properties 

  

Evaulate - 
E1 

Analyse the work of past and present professionals and others to develop and broaden their understanding 

E2 

Investigate new and emerging technologies 

E3 

Test, evaluate and refine their ideas and products against a specification, taking into account the views of intended users and other interested groups 

E4 

Understand developments in design and technology, its impact on individuals, society and the environment, and the responsibilities of designers, engineers and technologists 

  

Technical Knowledge - 
T1 

Understand and use the properties of materials and the performance of structural elements to achieve functioning solutions 

T2 

Understand how more advanced mechanical systems used in their products enable changes in movement and force 

T3 

Understand how more advanced electrical and electronic systems can be powered and used in their products [for example, circuits with heat, light, sound and movement as inputs and outputs] 

T4 

Apply computing and use electronics to embed intelligence in products that respond to inputs [for example, sensors], and control outputs [for example, actuators], using programmable components [for example, microcontrollers]. 

  

Cooking and Nutrition - 
C1 

Understand and apply the principles of nutrition and health 

C2 

Cook a repertoire of predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves and others a healthy and varied diet 

C3 

Become competent in a range of cooking techniques [for example, selecting and preparing ingredients; using utensils and electrical equipment; applying heat in different ways; using awareness of taste, texture and smell to decide how to season dishes and combine ingredients; adapting and using their own recipes] 

C4 

Understand the source, seasonality and characteristics of a broad range of ingredients. 

Enrichment Opportunities: 

Pupils will have the opportunity to attend trips to museums and galleries linked to the projects they are completing as signposted above. Visiting artists will also give pupils the opportunity to develop a dialogue with practitioners and reflect on their own artist practise. Art clubs at KS3 and KS4 will provide extra study time and further opportunities to experiment with different materials and resources outside of lessons. Displaying pupils work and having regular exhibitions of artwork will allow pupils to celebrate their achievements in a whole school capacity.  Students studying GCSE Art in Year 11 will have an opportunity to visit the Tate Modern in the Autumn 2 term. 

 

Year 7, 8, 9 Drop Down Days 

Activities 

Links to the DT curriculum 

Visit to the Design Museum (Yr 9 on 7.2.22, Yr8 on 7.3.22, Yr9 on 24.5.22) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit to the Science Museum (Year 7 on 7.2.22) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit to the Victoria and Albert Museum (Year 7 on 7.2.22) 

 

Designer Maker User Exhibition features almost 1000 items of twentieth and twenty-first century design viewed through the angles of the designer, manufacturer and user, including a crowdsourced wall. 

 

The free display covers a broad range of design disciplines, from architecture and engineering to the digital world, fashion and graphics. 

 

Hands on Design Workshop- Chairs and Seating 

What makes a good chair and why are designers obsessed with perfecting this particular piece of furniture?  

 

Students are given a user centre design brief and asked to create their own design in response to it.  

 

 

Pre-visit task: MY ROBOT MISSION AR 

Created in partnership with 42 Kids, this new skills-building app combines a series of fun challenges and the latest augmented reality technology to help you think like a scientist. Create your own robot and help it overcome future world problems. 

 

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.factory42.myrobotmissionar 

https://apps.apple.com/us/app/id1526505719 

 

 

Key Stage 3: Art & Design, Design & Technology 

 

Learn about the design processes and inspiration behind iconic buildings in the V&A and RIBA architecture collections and use these ideas to inspire new product design projects. 

 

https://vanda-production-assets.s3.amazonaws.com/2016/08/30/13/42/36/a6790236-2c7a-4bdf-b868-5bf253626433/DesignProcesses.pdf 

 

https://vanda-production-assets.s3.amazonaws.com/2017/01/04/11/53/09/63fade9f-ab6f-4fa0-852d-c09962a8244e/Design%20Processes%20Activities.pdf 

 

E2 Investigate new and emerging technologies 

 

E4 Understand developments in design and technology, its impact on individuals, society and the environment, and the responsibilities of designers, engineers and technologists 

 

T2 Understand how more advanced mechanical systems used in their products enable changes in movement and force 

 

T3 Understand how more advanced electrical and electronic systems can be powered and used in their products [for example, circuits with heat, light, sound and movement as inputs and outputs] 

Waste Age: What can design do? 

 

A remote in school workshop hosted run by the Design Museum 

The Sustainable Design Schools Programme brings to life the impact of waste and showcases a new approach across the production of food, fashion, electronics and other consumer goods, which focuses on the circular economy and reduction of waste. 

 

Working with a small handling collection of objects from our Waste Age exhibition, students are encouraged to rethink how we design, buy and use things. During the session, they will evaluate what different objects are made of, why they are designed this way and how essential they are. Using their findings, they will be challenged to design alternatives that take into consideration a circular approach to design. 

E2 Investigate new and emerging technologies 

 

E4 Understand developments in design and technology, its impact on individuals, society and the environment, and the responsibilities of designers, engineers and technologists 

 

Imperial College Robotics Academy- Year 7 Workshops 

CastorBot - Program a robot to move and detect obstacles in its path, stopping as close as possible to the obstacle without touching it. 

SumoBot - Construct a formidable battle-robot and program it to knock the opponent robot out of the ring while trying to stay within the ring. 

 

DoggoBot - Design a companion robot to follow and greet people close by. 

 

Line Follower - Program a robot to move around a circle, sticking as close to the black line as possible using a 3-state solution. As extension, for advanced learners or older students, there exists the Advanced Line Follower. There, the students apply knowledge of algebra to program a robot to move around a circle using a proportional solution, based on the 3-state solution. 

T4 Apply computing and use electronics to embed intelligence in products that respond to inputs [for example, sensors], and control outputs [for example, actuators], using programmable components [for example, microcontrollers]. 

Royal Navy Visit (15.11.22) 

90 minute ready steady cook challenge. 

 

The students will be working in teams to create a main and a dessert which they will present to the team and get some feed 

C2 Cook a repertoire of predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves and others a healthy and varied diet 

 

C3 Become competent in a range of cooking techniques [for example, selecting and preparing ingredients; using utensils and electrical equipment; applying heat in different ways; using awareness of taste, texture and smell to decide how to season dishes and combine ingredients; adapting and using their own recipes] 

 

Year 6 to 7 Transition: 

Art teachers in the secondary have previously taught in NSWL primary and have access to the curriculum taught (KAPOW), having a clear understanding of knowledge, skills and processes pupils have covered in KS1-2. The KS3 curriculum is designed with progression in mind with the Virtues and Golden Threads at its heart. At the beginning of year 7 all pupils complete a baseline assessment which ensures that subject specific data can be used to assess their progress across KS3-5. Pupils are also asked to complete an MS FORMS questionnaire to collect information on what types of projects, materials, skills and knowledge they have experienced in primary school.  NSWL primary students will have had weekly art lessons; however, pupils from outside of NSWL may only have had a few hours per term. Collecting this information from pupils who are new to NSWL and have come from other primary schools, helps build a picture of their experiences so that tasks, projects and skills in KS3 can be better differentiated and adapted. The KS3 curriculum is designed to build upon skills that that already exist whilst closing gaps for pupils who may not have these skills.  

Impact: 

Formative assessment is an integral part of our approach to Teaching and Learning. Over the course of their study, we will use weekly cumulative formative diagnostic assessments (in class or for homework) to ensure that students are consistently retrieving their knowledge of different components. The purpose of this is to ensure all knowledge is retained (and any gaps are identified and addressed promptly) and also to inform teachers’ planning. Using this style of assessment, we will make use of the advantages of spaced practice as well as allowing pupils to be able to apply their knowledge to a wide variety of contexts.  

Students will also sit a summative assessment every full term. This assessment will be cumulative and will assess not only what the students have learned over the previous term, but also their understanding of all relevant material previously taught. Staff are supported to mark these accurately and post assessment moderation also takes place to ensure the validity of the data. All data is analysed centrally (not by teachers) and each Curriculum Leader is given a report outlining the areas of strength and weakness. Curriculum Leaders use this information to inform future planning, support with additional interventions and set changes. 

Most projects will produce final outcomes or final pieces. Sketchbook work and loose paperwork will allow students to build a body of work and skills which cover all formal elements and ultimately prepare them for the rigour of GCSE and beyond.  

All GCSE coursework and exam work will be moderated by colleagues from Nishkam High School Birmingham and colleagues from local schools within Hounslow to ensure accuracy of marking. Exam board provided exemplar materials will also be used to cross reference against the work of pupils at NSWL and ensure accuracy of marking.