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Food and Nutrition

Intent: 

The curriculum has been designed to empower children with virtues that enable them to excel academically and spiritually inspiring them to serve humanity selflessly (Nishkam), with an abundance of love, compassion, and forgiveness. The curriculum aims to support pupils to learn about peace, forgiveness, love, and faith in the Divine through their academic subjects, faith practice and personal development. 

Our curriculum is constructed around our vision to ensure we remain:  

Faith-inspired: learning from the wisdom of religion.

Our pupils explore the divine context of humanity and wonder of all creation. They not only learn about, but also learn from, the wisdom of religions and in so doing explore the infinite human potential to do good unconditionally. We support pupils to develop aspects of their own religious, spiritual or human identities. They learn about serenity through prayer and humility in service and in so doing, they deepen their own respective faith, and respect the common purpose of all religious traditions, as well as respecting the beliefs of those with no faith tradition. They explore the unique divinity of the individual, and our common humanity. 

Virtues-led: nurturing compassionate, responsible human beings.

We believe that the fostering of human virtues forms the foundation of all goodness. Our curricula are carefully enriched to allow experiences where our pupils, teachers and parents alike learn to grow through a conscious focus on virtues. Our virtues-led education approach helps to provide guidance to enable pupils to understand their choices in order to help lead better lives. Our pupils become self-reflective and flourish; they are able to build strong, meaningful relationships and understand their responsibilities to the global family and all creation, founded in faith. Pupils learn to experience faith through lived out through righteous living in thought, action and deed. 

Aspiring for Excellence: in all that we do.

Our pupils and staff alike aim to become the best human beings they can possibly be, in all aspects of spiritual, social, intellectual and physical life. We foster a school culture which inspires optimism and confidence, hope and determination for all to achieve their best possible. This is accomplished through a rich and challenging curriculum, along with excellent teaching to nurture awe and wonder. Pupils gain a breadth and depth of knowledge and a love of learning to achieve their full potential. 

The curriculum at Nishkam School West London has been carefully crafted to be broad, balanced and stimulating, giving every Nishkam student the opportunity to be knowledgeable, multi-skilled, highly literate, highly numerate, creative, expressive, compassionate and confident people.  Knowledge-rich, skills based and Faith-inspired, the Curriculum at Nishkam School West London is delivered through three Golden Threads that are unique to our ethos and virtues: 

1 Love and forgiveness vs. Enmity and Hate

2 Peace and Collaboration vs. Conflict and War  

3 Trust in God 

Every composite of our curriculum is constructed of components that have each of these threads at their core.  These elements can be clearly identified in our subject-based curriculum maps and Schemes of Learning documents.    

“Food is everything we are. It is an extension of nationalist feeling, ethnic feeling, your personal history, your province, your region, your tribe, your grandma. It's inseparable from those from the get-go.” - Anthony Bourdain 

As part of their work with food, pupils will be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking that will open the door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook being a crucial life skill that enables students to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life. 

Students will:  

  • Develop their knowledge, understand, and apply the principles of nutrition and health; 

  • Cook predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves and others a healthy and varied diet; 

  • Become competent in a range of cooking techniques in order to prepare food in a safe and hygienic way; 

  • Be able to select and prepare ingredients, use utensils and electrical equipment, apply heat in different ways, show an awareness of taste, texture, and smell to decide how to season dishes and combine ingredients, using and adapting their own recipes; 

  • Understand the source, seasonality, and characteristics of a broad range of ingredients. 

Curriculum links to ‘The Golden Threads’ (Peace, Love, Collaboration and Forgiveness)  

  • Resilience – The pupils will develop skills to enable them to become good cooks 

  • Cleanliness- The pupils will understand how to work hygienically and clean their own working environment  

  • Confidence – The pupils will practise a variety of skills and strategies to support them during practical work  

  • Respect – The pupils will respect the environment that they are working in and ensure that they use equipment and facilities with care  

  • Self-discipline - pupils will follow strict instructions to ensure high quality products 

  • Love and forgiveness – Pupils will be learning to love food and the ethics behind certain diets for example a ‘Vegan’ diet – looking at animal cruelty, ethics, and moral issues. Learning the virtue of love and forgiveness through theory lessons on ‘Food waste’ and world poverty.  

  • Peace/Collaboration – In all year groups, pupils will be preparing and cooking their food practical's whilst learning team skills in a peaceful calming manner. Developing the virtue of patience whilst preparing and cooking their food. Pupils will broaden their knowledge of different farming methods and food sustainability, encouraging collaboration 

Curriculum links to other Nishkam Virtues: 

The pupils will develop a sense of curiosity and fascination with techniques used in food, using their imagination to be as creative as possible in their food practical work.  They will develop empathy by gaining an understanding regarding food poverty, the environmental impact and the importance of clean water. This will lead to a deep sense of gratitude, as the pupils gain a significant understanding of food and the choices they have been blessed with and, as with everything we do at Nishkam School, the pupils will strive for excellence in all their theory and practical work in Food.  

Implementation: 

The Food and Nutrition Curriculum is split into three distinct areas: theory, skills and practical.  At Key Stage 3, the curriculum runs on a rotational basis with other subjects.  This explains why half-terms 4, 5 and 6 contain the same topics as Half Terms 1,2 and 3. 

Year 8

Half Term 1 
Half Term 2 
Half Term 3 
Half Term 4 
Half Term 5 
Half Term 6 

Preparing Food 

Theory: 

  • Name the three macronutrients 

  • State at least one function and source of each 

  • Recap and recall how to set up a practical lesson (HATTIE) 

  • Use the hob safely 

Demonstrate knife skills 

  • Name some unusual vegetables and describe how to prepare them 

Explain why vegetables are an important part of our diet 

Identify how vegetables can be used in food preparation and cooking 

  • Prepare and cook a high-risk food 

  • Practise using the grill and the hob 

Demonstrate knife skills by preparing vegetables 

  • Identify a range of fish we can cook with 

  • Explain how fish is classified 

  • Explain why fish is an important part of our diet 

Give a definition of denaturation and coagulation 

Practise using the oven 

Skills: 

Planning 

Understanding of theoretical knowledge 

Knife skills 

Using the hob 

Presenting food attractively 

Evaluation 

Explaining 

Describing 

Using the hob and the grill 

Knife skills 

Handling filo pastry 

Consistency 

Using the oven 

Evaluation 

Practical:  

Students will make the following dishes following the development of the theory and practical skills mentioned above: 

Pasta Salad 

Puff pastry basil, sweetcorn, and mozzarella triangles 

 

 

 

Presenting Food 

Theory: 

  • Analyse the foods most wasted in class. Compare their data with the foods most wasted in the UK 

  • Describe how to avoid food waste 

  • Examine the information required on a food label 

Analyse how that information could 

help reduce food waste 

  • Examine a traffic light label and analyse how the information helps the consumer make an informed choice 

  • List potential allergens in food 

Examine a food label to identify the potential allergens 

  • Use an electric whisk safely 

Investigate and draw conclusions about how chemical raising agents work 

  • Use the oven safely 

  • Make a biscuit dough to the correct consistency 

Shape a dough into 16 same-sized pieces 

Skills: 

Analysis 

Comparison 

Description 

Examine facts 

 

Knowledge on how to present food attractively 

Using electrical appliances 

Whisking 

Piping 

Presenting food attractively 

Analysis 

Using the oven 

Making a dough to the correct consistency – psychomotor skills 

Shaping 

Consistency 

Practical:  

Frittata 

Cheesecake 

Ginger biscuits 

Hot chocolate  

 

 

Expanding our Food Repertoire 

Theory: 

  • State the reasons why food is cooked 

  • Identify the three different ways in which heat is transferred 

  • Explain how heat is transferred 

  • Understand the term gelatinisation 

  • Demonstrate understanding of gelatinisation by making a smooth cheese sauce 

  • Give a definition of the term cereals 

  • Identify how the different types of rice and oats can be used in food preparation and cooking 

  • Explain how oats and rice are grown and milled 

  • List the practical skills they have used over the course 

  • Prepare, cook, and serve a dish that demonstrates a range of practical Work independently and safely skills 

Skills: 

Making a dough to the correct consistency – psychomotor skills 

Shaping 

Consistency 

Identification 

Explaining 

Description 

Sauce making 

Cooking pasta 

Using the hob 

Use of correct vocabulary 

 

Assessment 

Theory paper on  

Knowledge and understanding of the theoretical aspects of the module 

Practical: 

Pasta Bake 

Savoury rice 

 

 

Preparing Food

Theory: 

  • Name the three macronutrients 

  • State at least one function and source of each 

  • Recap and recall how to set up a practical lesson (HATTIE) 

  • Use the hob safely 

Demonstrate knife skills 

  • Name some unusual vegetables and describe how to prepare them 

Explain why vegetables are an 

  • important part of our diet 

Identify how vegetables can be used in food preparation and cooking 

  • Prepare and cook a high-risk food 

  • Practise using the grill and the hob 

Demonstrate knife skills by preparing vegetables 

  • Identify a range of fish we can cook with 

  • Explain how fish is classified 

  • Explain why fish is an important part of our diet 

Give a definition of denaturation and coagulation 

Practise using the oven 

Skills: 

Planning 

Understanding of theoretical knowledge 

Knife skills 

Using the hob 

Presenting food attractively 

Evaluation 

Explaining 

Describing 

Using the hob and the grill 

Knife skills 

Handling filo pastry 

Consistency 

Using the oven 

Evaluation 

Practical:  

Students will make the following dishes following the development of the theory and practical skills mentioned above: 

Pasta Salad 

Puff pastry basil, sweetcorn, and mozzarella triangles 

Presenting Food 

Theory: 

  • Analyse the foods most wasted in class. Compare their data with the foods most wasted in the UK 

  • Describe how to avoid food waste 

  • Examine the information required on a food label 

Analyse how that information could 

help reduce food waste 

  • Examine a traffic light label and analyse how the information helps the consumer make an informed choice 

  • List potential allergens in food 

Examine a food label to identify the potential allergens 

  • Use an electric whisk safely 

Investigate and draw conclusions about how chemical raising agents work 

  • Use the oven safely 

  • Make a biscuit dough to the correct consistency 

Shape a dough into 16 same-sized pieces 

Skills: 

Analysis 

Comparison 

Description 

Examine facts 

 

Knowledge on how to present food attractively 

Using electrical appliances 

Whisking 

Piping 

Presenting food attractively 

Analysis 

Using the oven 

Making a dough to the correct consistency – psychomotor skills 

Shaping 

Consistency 

Practical:  

Frittata 

Cheesecake 

Ginger biscuits 

Hot Chocolate 

Expanding our Food Repertoire 

Theory: 

  • State the reasons why food is cooked 

  • Identify the three different ways in which heat is transferred 

  • Explain how heat is transferred 

  • Understand the term gelatinisation 

  • Demonstrate understanding of gelatinisation by making a smooth cheese sauce 

  • Give a definition of the term cereals 

  • Identify how the different types of rice and oats can be used in food preparation and cooking 

  • Explain how oats and rice are grown and milled 

  • List the practical skills they have used over the course 

  • Prepare, cook, and serve a dish that demonstrates a range of practical Work independently and safely skills 

Skills: 

Making a dough to the correct consistency – psychomotor skills 

Shaping 

Consistency 

Identification 

Explaining 

Description 

Sauce making 

Cooking pasta 

Using the hob 

Use of correct vocabulary 

 

Assessment 

Theory paper on  

Knowledge and understanding of the theoretical aspects of the module 

Practical: 

Pasta Bake 

Savoury rice 

 

Year 9

Half Term 1 
Half Term 2 
Half Term 3 
Half Term 4 
Half Term 5 
Half Term 6 

Understanding Different Food Groups 

Theory  

  • Name the places bacteria come from 

  • State how and why food may become contaminated with bacteria 

  • Recap and recall how to set up a practical lesson (HATTIE) 

  • Name the micronutrients – vitamins A, B group, C and D, and minerals calcium, iron and sodium (salt) 

  • State at least one function and source of each micronutrient 

  • Name the stages in making wheat flour 

  • Be able to explain the difference between wholemeal, brown, and white flour 

  • Name the different target groups 

  • Understand how nutritional needs vary with age and health conditions 

  • State at least one nutritional need of each target group 

  • Match specific nutrients to foods 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Skills  

 

Planning 

Understanding of theoretical knowledge 

Knife skills 

Preparing vegetables 

Using equipment 

Using the hob 

Presenting food attractively 

Evaluation 

Recall 

Explaining 

Describing differences 

Practical 

Minestrone soup 

Tomato and basil tart  

Banana chocolate chip muffins 

 

 

The Appeal of Food and Flavour 

Theory 

State the characteristics we use to evaluate food, e.g., appearance 

  • Describe the sensory characteristics of a variety of different foods using the correct sensory descriptors, e.g., attractive 

  • Recall the five main tastes 

  • Explain the three main types of sensory tests: preference, discrimination, and grading 

  • Recall the names of the macronutrients and micronutrients 

  • Use a temperature probe correctly 

  • Know the procedure for testing a temperature probe to ensure it is working correctly 

  • Recall the correct temperature for cooking and/or re-heating food (minimum of 75°C) 

Use a microwave oven to cook/re-heat food 

  • List as many types of milk as you can 

  • Identify what products can be made from milk 

  • Explain the differences between types of milk 

Describe how yoghurt and cheese are made 

  • List the function of ingredients used to make pasta 

  • Name the main nutrient found in pasta 

 

Skills 

 

Dough – shortcrust pastry 

Knife skills 

Preparing vegetables 

Using the main oven – baking 

Using equipment 

Setting mixtures 

Applying nutritional knowledge to a recipe 

Using the oven 

Using equipment 

Cooking methods 

Raising agents: biological 

Dough: bread 


Practical 

Pizza 

Macaroni Cheese 

Spicy potato wedges 

Oat Cookies 

 

 

 

Global Food  

Theory 

  • Demonstrate how to successfully make flaky pastry 

  • Identify different factors that influence food choice 

  • Show a high standard of finish when presenting your pastry product 

  • Define seasonal food 

Identify some advantages and disadvantages of using seasonal food 

  • Define cuisine 

  • List some distinctive ingredients and dishes from Britain, Italy, China, and India 

Investigate further the distinctive features of British, Italian, Chinese, Indian cuisine, or a country of their choice 

  • Prepare, cook, and serve a dish from a country of their choice that demonstrates a range of practical skills 

  • Evaluate their performance in the practical assessment 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skills 

 

Examining 

Analysis 

Explaining 

Describing 

Identifying 

 

Psychomotor skills 

Making a dough 

Observation 

Identify 

Use of oven and hob 

Defining 

Listing 

Investigating 

Evaluating 

Knowledge and understanding of the theoretical aspects of the module 

Practical 

Seasonal fruit tart  

Vegan Fajitas 

International dish of their choice 

 

 

 

 

 

Different Forms of Food 

Theory 

  • Name the places bacteria come from 

  • State how and why food may become contaminated with bacteria 

  • Recap and recall how to set up a practical lesson (HATTIE) 

  • Name the micronutrients – vitamins A, B group, C and D, and minerals calcium, iron and sodium (salt) 

  • State at least one function and source of each micronutrient 

  • Name the stages in making wheat flour 

  • Be able to explain the difference between wholemeal, brown, and white flour 

  • Name the different target groups 

  • Understand how nutritional needs vary with age and health conditions 

  • State at least one nutritional need of each target group 

  • Match specific nutrients to foods 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skills  

 

Planning 

Understanding of theoretical knowledge 

Knife skills 

Preparing vegetables 

Using equipment 

Using the hob 

Presenting food attractively 

Evaluation 

Recall 

Explaining 

Describing differences 

Practical 

Minestrone soup 

Tomato and basil tart  

Banana chocolate chip muffins 

 

 

The Appeal of Food and Flavour 

Theory 

State the characteristics we use to evaluate food, e.g., appearance 

  • Describe the sensory characteristics of a variety of different foods using the correct sensory descriptors, e.g., attractive 

  • Recall the five main tastes 

  • Explain the three main types of sensory tests: preference, discrimination, and grading 

  • Recall the names of the macronutrients and micronutrients 

  • Use a temperature probe correctly 

  • Know the procedure for testing a temperature probe to ensure it is working correctly 

  • Recall the correct temperature for cooking and/or re-heating food (minimum of 75°C) 

Use a microwave oven to cook/re-heat food 

  • List as many types of milk as you can 

  • Identify what products can be made from milk 

  • Explain the differences between types of milk 

Describe how yoghurt and cheese are made 

  • List the function of ingredients used to make pasta 

  • Name the main nutrient found in pasta 

 

Skills 

 

Dough – shortcrust pastry 

Knife skills 

Preparing vegetables 

Using the main oven – baking 

Using equipment 

Setting mixtures 

Applying nutritional knowledge to a recipe 

Using the oven 

Using equipment 

Cooking methods 

Raising agents: biological 

Dough: bread 

Practical 

Pizza 

Macaroni Cheese 

Spicy potato wedges 

Oat Cookies 

Global Food  

Theory 

  • Demonstrate how to successfully make flaky pastry 

  • Identify different factors that influence food choice 

  • Show a high standard of finish when presenting your pastry product 

  • Define seasonal food 

Identify some advantages and disadvantages of using seasonal food 

  • Define cuisine 

  • List some distinctive ingredients and dishes from Britain, Italy, China, and India 

Investigate further the distinctive features of British, Italian, Chinese, Indian cuisine, or a country of their choice 

  • Prepare, cook, and serve a dish from a country of their choice that demonstrates a range of practical skills 

  • Evaluate their performance in the practical assessment 

Skills 

Examining 

Analysis 

Explaining 

Describing 

Identifying 

Psychomotor skills 

Making a dough 

Observation 

Identify 

Use of oven and hob 

Defining 

Listing 

Investigating 

Evaluating 

Knowledge and understanding of the theoretical aspects of the module 

Practical 

Seasonal fruit tart  

Vegan Fajitas 

International dish of their choice 

 

 

 

 

Year 10 

Half Term 1 
Half Term 2 
Half Term 3 
Half Term 4 
Half Term 5 
Half Term 6 

DURING YEAR 10 STUDENTS WILL CONCENTRATE ON UNIT 1 TO PREPARE FOR THE EXTERNAL EXAMINATION. DURING PRACTICALS THEY WILL FOCUS ON THE AC'S FROM UNIT 2 BELOW. 

Introduction to food safety. Know how food can cause ill health  

Unit 1  

LO4 know how food can cause ill health  

AC4.1  

Food safety  

Describe the roles and responsibilities of EHO  

Unit 1  

LO4 know how food can cause ill health  

AC4.2  

Food safety 

Describe food safety legislation 

Unit 1 

LO4 know how food can cause ill health 

AC4.3 

Practical work to be covered (LO3) 

Unit 2 

LO3: Be able to cook dishes. Developing and improving skills learnt at KS3. 

 

Practical’s to cover LO3 (3.1) to be able to cook dishes, LO 1: AC1.4 Explain how cooking methods impact on nutritional value, LO2: AC 2.3 Explain how menu dishes meet customer needs, LO2 2.4 plan production of dishes for a menu, LO 3: AC3.1 Use techniques in preparation of commodities, LO3:  AC3.3  Use techniques in cooking of commodities, LO3 AC3.4 complete dishes using presentation techniques and LO3AC 3.5 Food Safety practices safe use of equipment. 

Food safety 

Describe common types of food poisoning  

Unit 1 

LO4 know how food can cause ill 

health 

AC4.4 

Food safety 

Describe symptoms of ill health 

Unit 1 

LO4 know how food can cause ill health 

AC4.5 

 

Theory 

Unit 1 LO 1 AC 1.1 Structure of the Hospitality industry 

Unit 1 LO 1 AC 1.1 Hospitality at non-catering venues 

Unit 1 LO1 AC 1.1 Standards and Ratings 

Unit 1 LO1 AC 1.2 Job roles 

UNIT 2 PRACTICAL LO3 AC 3.1 -3.5 

Unit 1 LO 2 AC 2.1 Operations in kitchen 

Unit 1 LO2 AC 2.2 Describe operations at front of house. 

Unit 1 LO2 AC 2.2 Record Keeping 

Practical  

Unit 2 LO1: Understand the importance of nutrition when planning meals. 

LO2: Understand menu planning. 

 

Theory  

Unit 1 LO 3 AC 3.1 Personal safety 

Unit 1 LO 3 AC 3.1 COSSH 

Unit 1 LO 3 AC 3.1 PPE 

Unit 1 LO 3 AC 3.1 Manual Handling 

Unit 1 LO 3 AC 3.2 Risk assessment – various 

Unit 1 LO 3 AC 3.2 Risk and security 

Unit 1 LO 3 AC 3.3 Personal safety recommendations 

Practical 

UNIT 2 PRACTICAL LO3 AC 3.1 - 3.5 

Unit 1 LO 3 AC 3.1 RIDDOR 

Unit 1 LO 3 AC 3.2 Risks to personal safety 

UNIT 1 TEST  

 

Feedback  

This term would be used to further develop practical skills, finish any content not covered and complete the external assessments for the course. 

Revision on all the theory  

External examination  

21st June 2022 

Theory Unit 2 

Unit 2 brief given to pupils to start planning, research, and cooking of their dishes. Pupils will also be given mark so that they are fully aware of the requirements.  

Practical work to be covered (LO3) 

 

Year 11

Half Term 1 
Half Term 2 
Half Term 3 
Half Term 4 
Half Term 5 
Half Term 6 

Theory and Practical 

LO1: AC 1.1 Intro to basic nutrition - Eatwell guide, food groups and nutrients provided. 

LO1: AC 1.1 Intro to basic nutrition - Eatwell guide, food groups and nutrients provided. 

LO1: AC 1.2 compare nutritional needs of specific groups - different life stages such as childhood, adulthood and later adult hood and special diets 

LO1: AC 1.2 compare nutritional needs of specific groups - different life stages such as childhood, adulthood and later adult hood and special diets 

LO1: AC 1.2 Plan menus for different groups. 

LO1: 1.3 Characteristics of unsatisfactory nutritional intake - visible and non-visible, nutrient deficiencies and nutritional excesses. 

LO2 AC 2.1 Factors (see spec page 31) to consider when proposing menus for dishes (mindmap as a group, give scenarios to groups and present ideas). 

LO2 AC 2.1 Factors (see spec page 31) to consider when proposing menus for dishes (mindmap as a group, give scenarios to groups and present ideas). 

 

 

 

Theory and Practical  

LO2 AC 2.1 Factors (see spec page 31) to consider when proposing menus for dishes (mindmap as a group, give scenarios to groups and present ideas). 

LO2: AC 2.2 How dishes on a menu address environmental issues. Food waste. 

LO2 AC 2.3 How menu dishes meet customer needs. Investigate menus - nutritional, sensory, and cost. 

LO2 AC 2.3 How menu dishes meet customer needs. Link to scenarios. 

PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATIONS AND PRACTICAL WORK TO BE DONE ON WEEK 1. Practical to cover LO3 (3.1) to be able to cook dishes: Techniques such as: Weighing and measuring, chopping, shaping, peeling whisking, melting, Rub-in, sieving, segmenting, slicing, hydrating, and blending. Commodities: poultry, meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, cereal, rice, flour, pasta, vegetables, fruit, and soya products. Cooking methods impact on nutritional value (AC 1.4, during demonstrations) 

Mock examinations 

CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT: Unit 2  

Proposal: AC 1 .1 - 1.4, AC 2.2 - 2.3. 

CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT: Time 3 hours: Access to class notes, access to ICT software, access to internet to research possible dishes. Supervision throughout. Feedback cannot be given on work produced until marked. 

Time 2 hours: Access to class notes; access to ICT software: no access to internet. Supervision throughout. Feedback cannot be given on work produced until marked. 

Unit 2 AC2.4 Plan production of dishes for a menu 

PRACTICAL ASSESSMENTS: AC3.1 - 3.5 

PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATIONS AND PRACTICAL WORK TO BE DONE ON WEEK 1. Practical to cover LO3 (3.1) to be able to cook dishes: Techniques such as: Weighing and measuring, chopping, shaping, peeling whisking, melting, Rub-in, sieving, segmenting, slicing, hydrating, and blending. Commodities: poultry, meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, cereal, rice, flour, pasta, vegetables, fruit, and soya products. Cooking methods impact on nutritional value (AC 1.4, during demonstrations) Food Safety practices (LO3 3.5) use of equipment. During demonstrations - LO2: AC2.4 plan production of dishes for a menu to include times, mise en place, cooking, cooling, hot holding, completion and serving. During demonstrations - LO2: AC 2.4 plan production of dishes for a menu to include times, mise en place, cooking, cooling, hot -holding, completion and serving. 

CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT:  

Catch up sessions 

REVISION SESSIONS FOR EXTERNAL EXAMINATION 

PRACTICAL ASSESSMENTS: AC3.1 - 3.5 

CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT: 

Catch up sessions 

REVISION SESSIONS FOR EXTERNAL EXAMINATION 

REVISION SESSIONS FOR EXTERNAL EXAMINATION 

 

Enrichment Opportunities: 

Nishkam Food and Nutrition pupils are given the opportunity to enrich their cultural, historical and practical skills. Our lessons are also enriched by our cultural and multi-faith identity as the students are taught the significance of food within different cultures. Through well-organised learning objectives pupils achieve knowledge and practical skills through watching clips and planned food practical’s linking into major faith celebration days. The subject aims to develop a sense of belonging for our pupils through our Sikh ethos and core value of compassion, particularly the role of food in celebration days and cultural rituals. On Vaisakhi day, pupils and staff can participate in self-less seva (nishkam), a sit down ‘langar’ style meal is enjoyed by all, for our school community.  

The subject aims to encourage a range of employers to visit the department to run active and aspirational engaging cooking and theory-based workshops for example, Royal Navy and visiting professional chefs. Where appropriate pupils will also be given the chance to visit a range of establishments to engage with employers about food preparation and nutrition opportunities. Pupils are also enriched with serving our local wider community, cooking/fund raising for an interfaith homeless charity, demonstrating our golden threads and core Sikh beliefs of love and forgiveness, peace and collaboration, trust in God.   

The cultural capital gained from studying food at Nishkam is vast, as students will be learning about food which is grown and harvested in the UK and around the world, with both KS3 and KS4 pupils will research and cook international cuisines.  Pupils will gain an insight into the professional culinary world by watching cooking shows, researching, and reading literature about chefs from around the world for example: Gordon Ramsey (British), Ravinder Bhogal (British), Mary Berry (British), Alain Ducasse (French), Yoshihiro Murata (Japanese), Anula Devi (Indian) and Ken Hom (Chinese). 

Year 6 to 7 Transition:

Throughout their Primary education, Nishkam students will have been exposed to the fundamentals of Food and Nutrition.  The KS1 and 2 Science curriculum features a range of relevant material around the concept of health and well-being, whilst the Art, Design and Technology curriculum features a unit of work on Seasonal Eating and Healthy Food choices.  As part of this unit, the students have to select a range of items to feature in a healthy meal or lunchbox.  The KS2 PSHE programme features discussions on food poverty and sustainability.  In Year 7, a smooth transition is ensured, beginning with the role of macronutrients, the practical preparation of a range of familiar and unfamiliar vegetables and a study of food labelling.  By doing so, students are made aware of food as a source of energy and health before learning how food can become a source of enjoyment and a cornerstone of their cultural identity.